Everything You Need to Know About the Atlanta BeltLine Trails

Have you heard about the Atlanta BeltLine trails? They are part of a comprehensive program working to revitalize parts of the city and introduce programs to promote economic growth and sustainability. What started as a grassroots effort several years ago has blossomed into an expansive process. It’s currently underway and has already seen successes. Find out what you should know about this initiative in Atlanta!

The Atlanta BeltLine trails are one of the many fascinating aspects of our innovative and forward-thinking city. If you’re considering a visit, or maybe you’re a local looking to mix it up with new experiences, we can help you have a great time here. Request your free Travel Guide to Atlanta now! We filled it with local tips and useful information on activities and attractions. Get yours now to see our recommendations for places to go and things to do! You’ll be well on your way to an unforgettable trip!

What Are the Atlanta Beltline Trails?

The Atlanta BeltLine trails are part of a massive program looking to expand and improve upon Atlanta’s transport infrastructure and public spaces. It is building upon the 22-mile corridor formerly used for the railroad system around the city. Eventually, this project will connect 45 neighborhoods with 33 miles of multi-use trails and 50 miles of an interconnected transit system. What was once underutilized space will soon be revitalized for public use. The plans also include building affordable housing units and 2,000 acres of public parks.

How Did the Project Start?

Ryan Gravel, a student at Georgia Tech, proposed the initial idea through his master’s thesis. Gradually, it gained traction and support to become a growing grassroots effort. Today, the BeltLine project is fully underway and bringing Ryan’s dream to life in Atlanta.

When Will It Be Complete?

The Atlanta BeltLine timeline suggests the entire project should be complete in 2030. By then, expect to see miles of pedestrian trails, modern streetcars on a more efficient transit system, scenic public parks, and revamped communities.

Can I Explore Parts of It Now?

Yes! Workers have already built or updated five trails, seven different parks, and affordable housing units. In addition, Trees Atlanta is currently working on the Atlanta BeltLine Arboretum, which will line the 22-mile corridor with a variety of plant life. They have already planted more than 43 kinds of wildflowers and grasses! Feel free to grab your Atlanta BeltLine trail map and explore some of these trails open to the public:

Programs and Events

There are additional ways to explore and learn about the project. If you’d like, you can take a guided tour of the BeltLine trail on foot, bus, or bike. Feel free to check out Art on the Atlanta BeltLine, too. It’s the most prominent outdoor, temporary, art exhibit in the region and it’s still growing! Explore the trails to find paintings, sculptures, street performances, and more. From September to November, you can enjoy the Lantern Parade Festival as well! There are even health and fitness initiatives to promote the well-being of residents in an interactive, enjoyable way.

Stay at Stonehurst Place Bed and Breakfast to Explore the Trails

Stonehurst Place Piano Room

If you want to check out the BeltLine trails or enjoy an unforgettable getaway to Atlanta, we invite you to stay at Stonehurst Place. Our bed and breakfast in Midtown Atlanta is not your average inn. Our luxurious accommodations, top-notch service, and impressive amenities are unmatched.

Find museum-quality artwork along our walls, including works by Andy Warhol. Our guest rooms feature seven-layer beds with luxury linens, marble bathroom floors, and Amazon Echo alarm clocks. The suites also feature heated bathroom floors! Whichever room you stay in, you can always wake up to a freshly-made gourmet breakfast and enjoy complimentary refreshments throughout the day.

Get started on the trip of a lifetime to Midtown Atlanta. Check our availability and book your stay today!

Photo credit: Anne Simone